Posts from 2011.

Great Pygame Example Site

I wanted to share this link to a great site with some simple Pygame examples:

Python and Pygame Examples

There is also a textbook draft called “Introduction to Computer Science Using Python and Pygame” by Paul Vincent Craven.

“MooseGesture” – Python Mouse Gestures Module

“MooseGesture” is a Python module that implements a basic mouse gesture recognition system. It can identify gestures made up of strokes in the eight cardinal and diagonal directions.

A mouse gesture is holding down the mouse button and moving the mouse cursor in a specific pattern to issue a command.
Mouse gestures are a way of dragging with the mouse in order to draw out a certain pattern. The most mainstream uses of mouse gestures in computer software are for web browsers. (Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Internet Explorer)

Mouse gestures can provide an interesting game mechanic that you can add to your own programs (similar to what the Wiimote does in a few games).

You can download the module (and a simple Pygame test script that uses it) here:

MooseGestures & Test App (zipped)

moosegesture.py

moosegesturetest.py

Simon Gesture – A game that uses the MooseGesture module.

(The screenshot above shows the test app after entering a mouse gesture. It correctly identifies the gesture as Down Right Up.)

(The above screenshot shows a more complicated gesture: Down, Up, Down, Right, Left, Right.)
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Free Music, Sound Effects, Tiles, and 2D Art to Use in Your Games

I’ve compiled a list of free graphics and sound files that you can use in your games. The chapter on using graphics and sound files with the Pygame library is in Chapter 19 of the “Invent with Python” book.

UPDATE: I just found a great, huge list: The Ultimate Indie Game Developer Resource List. There’s also the Wikimedia Commons, OpenClipArt.org, and www.sxc.hu, a free stock photography site.

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New Game Source Code: Squirrel Eat Squirrel

Made a new game with Pygame. It’s called “Squirrel Eat Squirrel”, where you move your squirrel around the screen eating the smaller squirrels and avoiding the larger ones. The more squirrels you eat, the larger you grow. This is a Python 3 game, but I think it’s compatible with Python 2. You need Pygame installed as well.

Use the arrow keys to move around. You can be hit three times before you die.

Download the source & images.

Try modifying the constant variables at the top of the file to change around the game. (Squirrel speeds, number of squirrels, amount of health, etc.) This isn’t part of my Code Comments tutorials, since I haven’t had time to go through and add detailed comments to the code (but it’s still commented.)

New Extra Game: Connect Four clone

I have a text version of a Connect Four clone done. The AI for it looks ahead two moves, which makes it fairly impossible to beat unless you concentrate. I was planning to use this game for a chapter on recursion in my next book, but decided to publish the code for the text-version now.

Download fourinarow.py (This is for Python 3, not Python 2)

The code has few comments, but looking at its source code might be a good exercise for someone learning to program. It’s available on the book’s website in the Extra section.

1000th Book Sold!

I’d just like to announce that “Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python” has just sold its 1000th hard copy since it’s gone on sale last May. I’d like to say a general thanks to everyone who has found this book useful. Thank you!

If you like the book, it would be great if you could write a review for it on its page on Amazon.com.

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